A culturally significant conjunto night club, a limestone house that is one of the most photographed sites in Texas, a historic African-American seminary, a restaurant that is a classic example of mid-century commercial architecture, and a tract of land on the Rio Grande that holds archaeological and architectural evidence of many layers of history dating back to 1598 are among the twelve sites that Preservation Texas, Inc. has named to its eleventh annual list of Texas’ Most Endangered Places.

“The 2014 list is a diverse group of sites that reflect the range of preservation issues that historic places throughout the state are confronting,” said Evan Thompson, executive director of Preservation Texas. “The sites are cultural, architectural and historic icons that are at imminent risk of disappearing from the landscape. Local grassroots organizations have been working tirelessly in support of these sites. By including them on the 2014 list, we hope to rally Texans statewide to step up and save them by supporting job-creating investments in our state’s at-risk historic places.”
Historic preservation is a billion dollar industry in Texas. Historic sites named to the list of Texas’ Most Endangered Places represent some of the biggest opportunities to make a positive economic impact on local communities through preservation. Preservation Texas supports sites on its Most Endangered Places List providing technical assistance to identify preservation needs and set priorities, fund raising expertise, and assistance in fostering and building community partnerships.
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